What does “moderate to severe immunocompromise'' mean?

These conditions or treatments include but are not limited to:

  • Active treatment for solid tumor and hematologic malignancies
  • Receipt of solid organ transplant and taking immunosuppressive therapy
  • Receipt of CAR-T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (within 2 years of transplantation or taking immunosuppression therapy)
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (e.g. DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids (i.e. equal to or greater than 20mg or equivalent per day), alkylating agents, antimetabolites, transplant-related immunosuppressive drugs, cancer chemotherapeutic agents classified as severely immunosuppressive, tumor-necrosis (TNF) factor blockers, and other biologic agents that are immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory

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1. Are boosters available for children ages 12-15?
2. Where can I get a COVID vaccine?
3. What is the difference between a “booster” dose and a third dose?
4. Who is eligible for a “booster” shot?
5. Is the Health Department offering “booster” doses?
6. What does “moderate to severe immunocompromise'' mean?
7. I have a moderate or severe immunocompromise, how do I find a third dose of vaccine?
8. Does the Health Department have Pfizer, Moderna and J&J Vaccine?
9. I lost my vaccine card or need vaccine record information.
10. Are boosters available for children ages 12-15?