What type of permits are reviewed at public hearings?

Permit Type and standards

Site Plan Approval (Planning Board) review looks at the details of a project (e.g., traffic mitigation, stormwater, pedestrian access), not the use. The board can only deny a site plan if the project cannot meet the technical criteria-- usually only if an applicant refuses to provide necessary information. Some projects require special permits and site plan approval simultaneously. Other agencies and representatives can help review major and complex projects to provide feedback to applicants and boards.

Required Vote:  Majority of members present.

Special Permit (Planning Board and Zoning Board) review determines whether or not the proposed use is appropriate based on the permit criteria. The board may deny a project IF it finds that the criteria are not met, or cannot be met even with conditions.

Required Vote: Board super-majority (5 planning board or 3 zoning board)

Special Permit (Planning Board) for multifamily or mixed commercial/residential within 1/2 mile of train or bus pulse point if 10% are affordable units, and reduction of parking to encourage density.

Required Vote: Majority of the Board

Subdivision approval of projects which require new roads (Planning Board), based on infrastructure standards, and approval not required of survey plans, based on sufficiency of the frontage.

Required Vote:  Majority of members present

Central Business Architecture (Central Business Architecture Committee) review of  the design of buildings, not the uses, in accordance with existing standards.

Required Vote:  Majority of members present

Wetlands permits (Order of Conditions and Determination of Applicability) (Conservation Commission) review is of the wetlands impacts based on specific criteria, not the desirability of a project.

Required Vote: Majority of members present

Historical Commission (demolition delay and historic district) review is based on the specific historic preservation or compatibility standards in the regulations, not on the desirability of a project.

Required Vote: Majority of members present

Show All Answers

1. How do I get a permit for new construction on my property?
2. What if my project requires a public hearing?
3. What type of permits are reviewed at public hearings?
4. How do I find out about projects in my neighborhood?
5. Where do I comment or ask questions about a project?
6. Who approves projects that require a public hearing?
7. What happens after a public hearing?